Etruscan… well, who were they?

The name ‘Percorsi Etruschi’ was inspired by our ancestors, the Etruscan people.

The Etruscan flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE, in Central Italy.

The area traditionally referred to as “Etruria” was the territory of Central Italy that lies between the Arno River to the North, Tiber River to the South East, and the Apennine Mountains to the East. This according to Latin literary sources but modern archaeological research has demonstrated that other areas were connected to this region.
So it retains the name of “proper Etruria” for this area, but we now know that other areas, lying outside this region, was united to it.
We should always remember that the Etruscan civilization lasted for about a thousand years, and the territory it covered changed during this large amount of time.

The concept of “Etruria” was fluid, it was an area with no central government, no single body of law and no generally recognized borders.
The peoples scattered over this large territory identified themselves on the basis of common ethnic and cultural aspects, the identity of language and traditions: they called themselves Rasena, we call them Etruscans.

Their civilization was renowned in antiquity for its richness, ability in crafting metals and pottery and as a major Mediterranean trading power.

Much of its culture and even history was obliterated when it was conquered by Rome. Nevertheless, surviving Etruscan tombs, relics, roads and holy spots witness their prosperity and their deep connection with nature, the underworld and the sky gods. They were Italy’s first great civilization.
We are proud to carry on their name through our business to create some unforgettable memories for my customers.

Saint Patrick’s well in Orvieto

Saint Patrick’s well is one of the most famous attractions in Orvieto.
It was built by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger, at the behest of Pope Clement VIII who had taken refuge in Orvieto during the Sack of Rome (1527)

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